Tag: 1988 massacre

Solidarity of Iranians in Netherlands with the 1988 seeking justice movement

Solidarity of Iranians in Netherlands with the 1988 seeking justice movement

On Saturday, August 28, the supporters of the MEK in The Hague announced their solidarity and support for political prisoners at the Gohardasht Prison in Karaj, by holding a massacre photo demonstration and photo exhibition in front of the Dutch parliament.

The demonstrators declared also their solidarity with the 1988 Massacre seeking justice movement for a trial of the perpetrators of this massacre

Also an exhibition was organized by the Iranian youth of Netherlands in front of the parliament to inform people on Iran 1988 massacre in Iran, call for justice

Iran: Calls for an international commission into 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners

Iran: Calls for an international commission into 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners

By The National – 19th August 2017

A GROUP of politicians has called for an international commission to be set up to investigate the massacre in summer 1988 of more than 30,000 political prisoners in Iran, with a view to prosecuting those involved.

 

The call came in Paris, base of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), the country’s opposition-in-exile, during an exhibition highlighting the horrors of the massacre, from Paris Mayor Jean-François Legaret.

 

He was joined by several of his mayoral colleagues, Yves Bonnet, former head of France’s domestic anti-terrorism organisation and former Scottish MEP Struan Stevenson, president of European Iraqi Freedom Association.

Stevenson condemned a trip by EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini to Iran and said both Europe and the UN should demand an inquiry into the massacre.

 

“[Iranian President Hassan] Rouhani has been hailed in the West as a moderate and a reformist, despite the fact that more than 3500 people, including 80 women, have been executed during the four years he has been in office, catapulting Iran into pole position as the world’s number one state executioner per capita,” said Stevenson.

 

“Three days before Mogherini arrived in Tehran, Amnesty International published a 94-page report highlighting the ‘web of oppression’ that pervades Iran and detailing the catastrophic human rights situation in the country.

 

“The French government and the EU should also be demanding a full United Nations inquiry into the 1988 massacre, with Khamenei, [supreme leader Sayyid Ali Hosseini] Rouhani and their clique of killer clerics indicted for crimes against humanity and brought for trial before the international courts in The Hague.”

 

Maryam Rajavi, president-elect of the Iranian Resistance, said: “The people of Iran want to end the impunity of those in charge of the massacre and hold them accountable. This has turned into the Iranian people’s most important political demand from the clerical regime. We urge the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights to set up an independent commission of inquiry to investigate the 1988 massacre.”

Paris exhibition conference on 1988 Massacre in Iran

Paris exhibition conference on 1988 Massacre in Iran

Call for an international commission of inquiry to investigate 1988 massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in Iran

Human rights, in particular, bringing to justice the officials involved in the 1988 massacre, should be at the core of Iran policy

Human rights defenders, dignitaries, European politicians and the Iranian Resistance called for the formation of an international commission of inquiry into the massacre of political prisoners in Iran in the summer of 1988 and bringing those responsible for this genocide and crime against humanity to justice.

They stressed that the issue of human rights should be at the core of the West’s policy on Iran. They urged the UN, EU and the US to put the issue of flagrant and systematic violation of human rights in Iran on top of their agenda.

The call was made during an exhibition on the 1988 massacre that took place upon the initiative of Mr. Jean-François Legaret, the Mayor of Paris municipality District 1 at this municipality on Thursday, August 17, 2017.

In addition to Mr. Legaret, several French mayors including Armand Jacquemin, mayor of Moussy Le Vieux, Jean-Claude Jegoudez, mayor of Grisy-Sur-Seine, and Jacky Duminy, mayor of Ors took part and spoke at the exhibition.

The message of Maryam Rajavi

Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, the President-elect of the Iranian Resistance, in a message to the exhibition said 30,000 political prisoners were hanged in Iran in days such as these in the summer of 1988, without any reaction by Western governments.

Those who remained silent over this tragedy betrayed humanity because the mullahs found out that their crimes had no consequences. So, they continued by exporting their terrorism and fundamentalism abroad and drenching the Middle East in blood.

If in those days, the massacre had not been met with silence, today, the mullahs could not sink Syria in a whirlpool of blood.

The people of Iran want to end the impunity of those in charge of the massacre and hold them accountable. This has turned into the Iranian people’s most important political demand from the clerical regime. We urge the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights to set up an independent commission of inquiry to investigate the 1988 massacre. The UN Security Council must set up a special tribunal or refer the issue to the International Criminal Court to arrange for the prosecution of the leaders of the Iranian regime.
Mrs. Rajavi once again urged all governments to make their relations and trade with the religious fascism ruling Iran contingent on an end to executions and torture.

Governor Yves Bonnet, the former head of France’s domestic anti-terrorism organization; Struan Stevenson, a Scottish politician, President of “European Iraqi Freedom Association” and former President of the European Parliament’s Delegation for Relations with Iraq, were among the dignitaries who took part in this exhibition and supported the call by the head of the opposition.

 

Paris Conference Exhibition On 1988 Massacre In Iran

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Struan Stevenson

In his remarks, Stevenson condemned the recent trip of EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini to Iran and said: “Rouhani has been hailed in the West as a moderate and a reformist, despite the fact that more than 3,500 people, including 80 women, have been executed during the four years he has been in office, catapulting Iran into pole position as the world’s number one state executioner per capita. Several hundred people have been executed so far this year, including women and teenagers. Three days before Mogherini arrived in Tehran, Amnesty International published a 94-page report highlighting the ‘web of oppression’ that pervades Iran and detailing the catastrophic human rights situation in the country.”

He added: “The French government and the EU should also be demanding a full United Nations inquiry into the 1988 massacre, with Khamenei, Rouhani and their clique of killer clerics indicted for crimes against humanity and brought for trial before the international courts in The Hague.”

Khomeini, the founder of the clerical regime in the summer of 1988, in a fatwa that was unprecedented in the history of Islam, stated that all those who were imprisoned throughout Iran and were still loyal to the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran should be executed. More than 30,000 political prisoners who were serving their terms were executed in a few months based on this criminal fatwa. The Death Commissions, in trials that lasted just a few minutes, sent to the gallows any of the prisoners who were not willing to condemn the PMOI (MEK). The victims were buried in mass graves in secret.

In spite of the mullahs’ attempts to impose silence on this crime against humanity and to prevent the spread of this issue in the society, the movement calling for justice for the victims of the massacre in Iran has expanded since last year and has evolved into a public issue. The Justice seeking movement in Iran managed to corner the mullahs.

Ali Khamenei intended to put a member of the 1988 massacre’s Death Commission in the office of president, but the nationwide campaign calling for justice foiled his plans.

During the last year, new information about the slaughter, including a large number of names of the victims, as well as the locations of numerous mass graves which the mullahs had previously concealed, has surfaced.

The 1988 massacre and the conspiracy of silence has been an issue of consensus among the regime’s various factions and its senior officials.

Over the past four years, the mullahs’ president Hassan Rouhani had appointed Mostafa Pour-Mohammadi, one of the key officials in charge of the 1988 massacre, as Minister of Justice. The new Justice Minister for his second term, Alireza Avaie, is another one of the perpetrators of the massacre, who has been already designated as a violator of human rights by the European Union.

A number of relatives of the victims and individuals who spent years in prison in Iran and were tortured shared their observations with the audience during the exhibition.

Demands for justice in the 1988 massacre continue to grow in Iran

Demands for justice in the 1988 massacre continue to grow in Iran

By Merinews – 11 August 2017

With the rise of the 1988 Justice-Seeking Movement, Iranian regime, Iranian regime president Hassan Rouhani was forced to dismiss his Justice Minister, Mostafa PourMohammadi from his cabinet.

PourMohammadi was part of the 1988 Death Committee and one of the main perpetrators of the massacre, which ended in 30,000 political prisoners being executed.

Yet, despite Rouhani dismissing Pour Mohammadi, it is clear that the thinking of the regime has not truly changed. This dismissal was simply window-dressing, whitewashing over the issue of the massacre altogether.
Political prisoners are being suppressed and those who are attempting to defend their right to speak out and peacefully protest are also being repressed. Human rights defenders have been sentenced to long prison terms, often on vague charges of being national security risks.
The proceedings where the sentencing takes place are often brief, barely following any type of legal international precedent for a fair trial. Anti-death campaigners Atena Daemi and Omid Alishenas were sentenced to 14 and 10 years’ imprisonment respectively, after a trial in March 2015 that lasted around 45 minutes. On appeal, their sentences were reduced to seven years each.
Human rights lawyers who speak out on behalf of these individuals, particularly the torture and unfair trials, are also facing relentless harassment, disbarment, and imprisonment. Demanding answers from the Iranian regime, especially accountability for these human rights violations, comes with real life costs for those determined to find justice.
Additionally, executions continue to be an issue in Iran. 100 executions were carried out in July alone. Only eight of those executions were announced by Iranian officials. Drug-related charges accounted for 61 of the executions in July. The Iranian Parliament has approved a general plan to amend the law for combating drugs, even as executions related to drug charges continues.
“Had the Iranian authorities waited for the bill to pass, then the death sentences for many of those executed for drug offences would have been commuted to prison terms,” said Mahmood Amiry-Moghaddam, the spokesperson for Iran Human Rights. “It is incomprehensible why the Iranian authorities, who have admitted that the death penalty doesn’t reduce drug crimes, can’t stop drug-related executions for just a few months.”
Iran Human Rights has called for a halt to all executions in Iran and calls on authorities to remove the death penalty from Iran’s laws. Since the beginning of 2017, at least 340 people have been executed in Iran.

Rouhani appoints another perpetrator of 1988 massacre as justice minister

Rouhani appoints another perpetrator of 1988 massacre as justice minister

Al Arabiya English Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has appointed Alireza Avai to replace Mostafa Pourmohammadi as justice minister in his new cabinet. While Pourmohammadi was one of the three members of the 1988 massacre “Death Commission” in Tehran, Avai was directly involved in the massacre of political prisoners in Khuzestan Province during the same time period.

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Mass Executioner Replaces Another Executioner

Mass Executioner Replaces Another Executioner

NCRI – August 08 2017

Rouhani appoints another 1988 massacre executioner as justice minister

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has appointed Alireza Avaie, involved directly in the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran’s Khuzestan Province, to replace Mostafa Pourmohammadi as justice minister in the new cabinet. Pourmohammadi was one of the three members of the massacre 1988 massacre “Death Commission.”

Avaie served as Dezful’s public prosecutor from 1979 to 1988. During the 1988 massacre he was serving as the city’s Revolutionary Court prosecutor. Following a fatwa issued by then Iranian Supreme Leader Ruhollah Khomeini, Avaie was the main official in charge of executions in Younesco Prison. Based on eyewitness reports provided by various former prisoners, Avaie ordered “juvenile prisoners under the age of 18 to be executed in groups of two or three, carried out in an empty field near the prison.”

From 2005 to 2014 Avaie served as chief of the Tehran Province judiciary and then appointed as deputy interior minister. In July 2016 Rouhani had him elevated to the head of the president’s Special Inspections Office.

Avaie was sanctioned by the European Union in October 2011 for his role in human rights violations and direct participation of torturing and massacring political prisoners.

Replacing Pourmohammadi with Avaie, one executioner with another, proves that the entire mullahs’ establishment in Iran, especially its so-called judiciary, is intertwined with executions, killings and the massacre of political prisoners. Other justice ministers prior to Pourmohammadi, such as Morteza Bakhtiari and Ismaeel Shoushtari, were all involved in the 1988 massacre.

While most of the members of Rouhani’s new cabinet are the same previous figures, he was forced to replace Pourmohammadi with another official in charge of 1988 massacre due to the extensive disclosure of Pourmohammadi as a member of Four-Person Death Committee at the domestic and international level as well as broad public hatred against him.

The appointment of Avaie, who is very close to Rouhani, once again proves the fact that the hands all authorities of the regime, from each faction, are stained with the blood of the Iranian people, especially the political prisoners, and they should be brought to justice for their crimes against humanity.

Iran recently revived calls for justice for 1988 mass extrajudicial executions

Iran recently revived calls for justice for 1988 mass extrajudicial executions

Amnesty International August 2017 – Caught in a web of repression

Iran’s human rights defenders under attack

Human rights defenders targeted for seeking truth and justice include some born after the 1979 Revolution, who have taken to social media and other platforms to discuss the past atrocities and attended memorial gatherings held at Khavaran, a deserted gravesite in south Tehran where some of the thousands of political prisoners who were extrajudicially executed in the summer of 1988 are buried in unmarked mass graves. The prison sentences against Atena Daemi, 29, and Omid Alishenas, 33, are examples of court verdicts reviewed by Amnesty International in which engaging in online discussions about the 1988 massacres has been cited as evidence of “criminal” activity deemed threatening to national security and insulting to the founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran and used to convict the human rights defenders.

 

The renewed crackdown follows recently revived calls for an inquiry into the killings of several thousand political prisoners in a wave of extrajudicial executions across the country in the summer of 1988

 

The audio tape of Montazeri

So was the release in August 2016 of an audio recording of a meeting in 1988 in which senior officials were heard discussing and defending, for the first time, the details of their plans concerning the mass extrajudicial executions of 1988.  The audio file has revived calls for an inquiry into the killings of several thousand political prisoners in a wave of extrajudicial executions across the country during 1988. This has prompted renewed efforts by the authorities to silence all public discussions about the gross violations committed during the 1980s.

 

The renewed crackdown follows recently revived calls for an inquiry into the killings of several thousand political prisoners in a wave of extrajudicial executions across the country in the summer of 1988. This was triggered by the release in August 2016 of an audio recording of a meeting in 1988 in which senior officials are heard discussing and defending the details of their plans to carry out the mass executions.  The release of the audio recording triggered a chain of unprecedented reactions from high-level officials, leading them to admit for the first time that the mass killings of 1988 were planned at the highest levels of government.

The history of the 1988 Massacre

The mass extrajudicial executions of 1988 began shortly after an unsuccessful armed incursion by the Iraq based People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran in July that year. Political prisoners from across the country were rounded up and held incommunicado, with no news of them heard for months afterwards. Reports circulated among relatives that prisoners were being executed in groups and buried in unmarked mass graves. Distraught family members searched the cemeteries for signs of freshly dug trenches.

 

From late 1988 onwards, families were verbally told by the authorities that their relatives had been killed but the bodies were not returned and most locations of burial sites were not disclosed.  Most of those executed had already spent years in prison for the peaceful exercise of their rights, including undertaking activities such as distributing newspapers and leaflets, taking part in peaceful anti-government demonstrations, and having real or perceived affiliations with various political opposition groups. Some had already completed their sentences but had not been released because they refused to make statements of “repentance”.  Today, it is still not known exactly how many victims were extrajudicially executed and precisely where the victims were buried in secret. To date, no Iranian officials have been investigated and brought to justice for the extrajudicial executions. The authorities have deployed various tactics to destroy evidence of mass graves including bulldozing; turning the sites into unsightly garbage dumps; hiding mass graves beneath new, individual burial spots; and pouring concrete over mass graves.  They have also regularly tormented their families by referring to mass graves as “the damned land” (la’nat abad) and describing their loved ones as “outlaws” who did not deserve a proper burial or tombstone. Families have been forbidden from holding commemorative gatherings or decorating the mass gravesites with memorial messages.

Maryam Akbari Monfared, in an open letter from inside Evin prison, November

Prisoner of conscience Maryam Akbari Monfared filed, from inside prison, a formal complaint with the  Office of the Prosecutor in Tehran in October 2016, seeking an official investigation into the mass executions of several thousand political prisoners, including two of her siblings, in 1988; the location of the mass graves where their bodies were buried; and the identity of the perpetrators involved.  To date, the authorities have not processed the complaint. Instead, they have resorted to various punitive tactics. Since October 2016, they have refused to take her to her medical appointments outside prison to receive adequate treatment for her rheumatoid arthritis and thyroid problems. As a result, she is experiencing severe pain in her legs. They have also repeatedly threatened to stop her family visits. In May 2017, she was threatened with an additional three-year prison term and exile to a remote prison.  Maryam Akbari Monfared was arrested on 31 December 2009 and forcibly disappeared for five months. It later transpired that she had been held in solitary confinement for the first 43 days after her arrest, during which she was subjected to intense interrogations without access to a lawyer. She met her state-appointed lawyer for the first time at her trial, which was limited to one brief hearing lasting less than an hour. She was sentenced to 15 years in May 2010 after Branch 15 of a Revolutionary Court in Tehran convicted her of “enmity against God” (moharebeh). The conviction was solely based on the fact that she had made phone calls to her relatives, who are members of the banned People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran and had visited them once in Iraq. Her husband has said that during her trial session, the judge told her she was paying for the activities of her relatives with the PMOI. Branch 33 of the Supreme Court upheld the sentence in August 2010

Female political priosner Maryam Akbari Monfared

Human rights defenders targeted for seeking truth and justice include younger human rights defenders born after the 1979 Revolution who have taken to social media and other platforms to discuss the past atrocities, and attended memorial gatherings held at Khavaran.  For example, human rights activist Amir Amirgholi was imprisoned from December 2014 to May 2017 solely for his peaceful human rights activities, including participating in gatherings at Khavaran to commemorate people executed and buried in mass graves in 1988.  Amnesty International has reviewed court verdicts in which engaging in online discussions about the 1988 massacres has also been cited as evidence of “criminal” activity deemed threatening to national security and insulting to the founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran.  In the case of anti-death penalty activist Omid Alishenas (see Chapter 5), the court verdict mentions “publication of false materials about those executed in 1988 under the pretext of remembering victims” among the list of activities for which Omid Alishenas was convicted of “gathering and colluding to commit crimes against national security” and “insulting the Supreme Leader

Europe must not turn a blind eye to Iran’s human rights abuses

Europe must not turn a blind eye to Iran’s human rights abuses

‌By Struan Stevenson

 Al arabiya English Friday, 4 August 2017

Amnesty International has just published a 94-page report entitled “Caught in a web of repression: Iran’s human rights defenders under attack.” It details 45 specific instances of what the organization has described as a “vicious crackdown” coinciding with the supposedly moderate presidency of Hassan Rouhani, who begins his second term in office this week.

The overall takeaway is that Iranian authorities have repeatedly diminished the standards by which they accuse and convict activists and dissenters of national security crimes, while also increasing the severity of punishments that are meted out to those same people. The abusive nature of those punishments was reinforced by new revelations that emerged alongside the Amnesty International report, mainly regarding the Islamic Republic’s notorious overuse of the death penalty.

Iran has long maintained world-leading rates of execution, and the violence and repression of the past few years have been reflected in a pattern of hangings that includes periodic spikes during which dozens of people are put to death in a single month. Last month saw just such a spike, with at least 101 death sentences being carried out, to say nothing of those that might have gone ahead in secret.

In Iran, political prisoners are sentenced to hang with some frequency, usually on the basis of vague, religious charges like “enmity against God” or “insulting the sacred.”

executions_Iran

Repressive, theocratic regime

Executions speak to the repressive nature of the theocratic regime, which has only grown worse in the era of Rouhani, when the government is fractured between two factions, neither of which represents reform. Maryam Rajavi, the president of the leading coalition of Iranian dissidents, the National Council of Resistance of Iran, responded to the new death penalty figures by saying, “Beset by crises and fearing popular uprisings, Iran’s ruling theocracy has found no other way out but to escalate repression especially by mass and arbitrary executions.”

RELATED: Iran executes 100 people in one month alone

The NCRI statement went on to recommend that the international community disregard economic and political incentives to expand relations with the Islamic Republic, and instead undertake measures to hold its officials accountable not only for recent crackdowns and executions, but also for long-neglected past crimes, like the massacre of some 30,000 political prisoners in the summer of 1988.

Naturally, being “beset by crises” and the possibility of popular overthrow, the regime is deeply fearful of this sort of pressure, which would imply Western readiness to stand behind a domestic uprising in Iran, and to aid it by making sure that Tehran is not free to carry out reprisals against dissenters as it sees fit.

Absurd claim

Last month, Iran’s own so-called human rights monitor, Javad Larijani, made the absurd claim that the country does not hold any political prisoners. Immediately thereafter, foreign diplomats in Tehran were taken on a tour of the notorious Evin Prison, but human rights investigators were kept far away from the public relations stunt, while the diplomats were kept far away from wards that are known to house political prisoners almost exclusively.

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif has made similarly bold, easily ridiculed statements asserting the country’s innocence. But with or without the new Amnesty International report, no one with a modicum of knowledge of the Islamic Republic should ever take such claims seriously. Unfortunately, Zarif and other members of the Rouhani administration appear to be masterful at putting a friendly face on Iran’s clerical regime, even as its domestic abuses and foreign provocations continue to escalate.

Justice will only be achieved when the international community has the courage to reject Iran’s absurd, anemic denials and to instead respond with new economic and diplomatic pressure to the regime’s human rights abuses.

This is the only explanation for the fact that some Western officials, including European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini, agreed to attend this week’s re-inauguration of President Rouhani. These decisions were profoundly misguided, insofar as any Western presence at an Iranian state function presupposes that the relevant officials are turning a blind eye to human rights abuses that are not only continuing but escalating on Rouhani’s watch.

It is simply inconceivable that any of those officials are unaware of the information being shared by Amnesty and others. The most charitable explanation for their actions is that they do not hold Rouhani personally responsible for the crackdowns and are willing to offer their support to his administration in the hope that it will finally, after four years in office, begin to promote serious domestic reforms.

But if this is their thinking, it is painfully naïve. Rouhani has never been anything other than a loyal servant of the regime that tortures its citizens and imprisons them for upwards of 10 years simply for protesting previous human rights abuses. Soon after taking office in 2013 amidst the applause of Western officials, Rouhani thoroughly turned his back on human rights by appointing Mostafa Pourmohammadi, a leading figure in the 1988 massacre, as his justice minister.

Such officials must be brought to justice, lest the Iranian regime be convinced that it can get away with thousands of unlawful killings and still enjoy the presence of friendly European faces at its state functions. Justice will only be achieved when the international community has the courage to reject Iran’s absurd, anemic denials and to instead respond with new economic and diplomatic pressure to the regime’s human rights abuses.

Iran: The Rise in Justice-Seeking Movement for 1988 Massacre and Dismissal of Notorious Justice Minister

Iran: The Rise in Justice-Seeking Movement for 1988 Massacre and Dismissal of Notorious Justice Minister

IRAN, 04 August 2017– With the rise of the 1988 Justice-Seeking Movement, Iranian regime’s President Hassan Rouhani was forced to dismiss his Justice Minister, Mostafa Pour Mohammadi, from his cabinet. Pour Mohammadi was a member of the “Death Committee” and one of the main perpetrators of the massacre of 30,000 political prisoners in the summer of 1988. He announced that he would not be present in Rouhani’s next administration.

In addition, Rouhani’s Legal Deputy, Majid Ansari, another perpetrator of the 1988 massacre, announced that he will not be present in Rouhani’s future cabinet too.

On the other hand, on the eve of the start of Rouhani’s second term, some government media outlets affiliated to Rouhani’s band announced his retreat from the rival gang after his brother was arrested. The media wrote: “Before the arrest of Hossein Fereydoon, the promising news of the new cabinet was transmitted, but then, disappointing news is published every day.”

Live Broadcast Program on IRANNTV network dedicated to 1988 Massacre

Live Broadcast Program on IRANNTV network dedicated to 1988 Massacre

On July 4th, a live broadcast program on INTV channel had been dedicated to the Iran 1988 massacre for 5 hours.

The aim of this program was to collect new information about this massacre and to demand all the Iranian compatriots and friends of the Iranian resistance to inform Ms. Asmaa Jahangir, Mr. António Guterres about the massacre and its evidence and to expand the “Call for Justice” movement.

The first guest of the program was Mr. Mohammad Mohaddessin, NCRI’s Foreign Affairs committee Chairman. The clerical regime can never get away with this crime, he emphasized.

The second guest was Ms Soheila Sadegh, Chair of the Education Committee of the National Council of Resistance.

The list of victims of 1988 Massacre shows the extent of crimes in Iran and MEK’s roots across the country, she said.

She also asked for help by sending the pictures of the victims’ graves to register in history and to refer the information about the 1988 Massacre.

The next guest Ms. Hoori Seyedi, stating that the Call for Justice Movement is looking for information from the victims of 1988 Massacre.

Since the movement calling for justice has been launched, Khamenei must pay double price for each execution she explained.

During the past year, we received undeniable documents from mass graves in 19 provinces.

Mohammad Zand, one of the witnesses of 1988 Massacre, was the next guest. He endured 11 years behind bars as a political prisoner back in the 1980s.

Mohammad Zand: I can remember each moment when the perpetrators of the shocking massacre were preparing to carry out their plan, he explicated.

The last guest of this special program was Mr. Behzad Naziri of the NCRI’s Foreign Affairs Committee. He demanded of all the Iranian compatriots to send a letter to Mrs. Asma Jahangir, inform her about the 1988 Massacre and its evidences.

Correspondingly, during the program Iranians from Iran and other countries called the program to express their gratitude and reveal new information.

Samad from Iran: I ask the perpetrators and masterminds of 1988 Massacre, where did you tortured and buried our loved ones?

Mehdi from Iran: My father told me the clerical regime, killed political prisoners in 1988 Massacre, burned them and buried in mass graves

Jalal from Sweden: I was witnessed that 15 youths were tried and sentenced to execution in one day.

This program will continue on Saturday 5th and Sunday 6th on INTV network.